Heritage University reaches goal to create scholarship endowment for Native American students, KAPP-TV, August 29, 2018

TOPPENISH, Wash. – A $650,000 donation has allowed Heritage University to reach its goal of creating a $1.5 million endowment for Native American student scholarships.

courtesy KAPP-TV

They recently received the grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

It will be combined with matching funds from the Johnson Scholarship Foundation and other private donors, to create the endowment which supports scholarships for indigenous students studying business and entrepreneurship.

Read more at YakTriNews.com.

Heritage University and PNWU collaborate to prepare students for health science careers, Yakima Herald-Republic, July 24, 2018

The sweet smell of strawberries lingered as students wearing white lab coats and rubber gloves carefully mashed the fruit inside small plastic bags.

Seated at long tables in the classroom at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences this month, the 10 young men and women from the Yakama Nation Tribal School and the Mt. Adams School District were performing an experiment as part of the inaugural Summer Program for Yakama Students.

Read more at YakimaHerald.com.

A student in the Summer Program for Yakama Students (SPYS) extracts DNA from strawberries as part of the program which prepares young people for careers in health science

Diversity outreach belongs on campus (editorial), Yakima Herald-Republic, July 15, 2018

Reaction from local universities to the Trump administration’s recent retraction of Obama-era “guidance” promoting diversity in the admissions process turned out to be something slightly more than a collective shoulder shrug but far less than an Edvard Munch “The Scream”-like freak out.

As it should be.

Read more at YakimaHerald.com.

Jumping the urban-rural divide through digital stories, Walla Walla Union-Bulletin, July 11, 2018

Digital storytelling came to Walla Walla this summer, through a partnership between Whitman College and Heritage University in Toppenish, Wash.

Over a period of several weeks, nearly two dozen students — equal populations from both schools — worked together in a new, place-based storytelling project called Rural American Digital Lab, or RADLab, as it got nicknamed.

Read more at union-bulletin.com.

Summer program for Yakama students, KAPP-TV, July 12, 2018

TOPPENISH, Wash. – Two local universities are working together in a unique five-week summer science program.

Heritage University and Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences are working with the Mount Adams School District and the Yakama Nation Tribal School on a science program that is focusing on students living on the homelands of the Yakama Nation.

Read more at Yaktrinews.com

Heritage students overcome much to succeed (editorial), Yakima Herald-Republic, July 13, 2018

YAKIMA, Wash. — This newspaper recently published articles related to a lack of college success among our youth in the Yakima Valley. Experts have suggested that poverty, lack of higher education of parents and ignorance of opportunity contribute to this disparity. However, a significant number of students at Heritage University have surmounted these supposed barriers.

Read more at YakimaHerald.com.

Summer program prepares students for health and science jobs that may benefit the valley, KIMA-TV, July 11, 2018

Students in SPYS class (KIMA-TV)

Students in SPYS class (KIMA-TV)

YAKIMA Wa. — University leaders are teaching young students about health and science careers to prepare them for jobs in the Yakima Valley.

Heritage University and Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences have come together with the Mt. Adams School District and Yakama Nation Tribal School to create a science- focused program for middle and high school students.

Student Jayenell Lee who is attending the five-week program and she says she wants to go into the Neuro Science field and feels like this program is helping her get there.

Read more at KIMATV.com

KIMA-TV covers SPYS

A KIMA-TV reporter capturing video for a story on SPYS

Heritage, CWU say they won’t abandon race considerations, Yakima Herald-Republic, July 7, 2018

Heritage University campus scenes Sept. 30, 2016 at Heritage University in Toppenish, Wash. (GORDON KING/Gordon King Photography)

YAKIMA, Wash. — Last week, the Trump administration announced it would not encourage schools to use race as a factor in the admissions process, rescinding Obama-era guidance meant to promote diversity among students.

Officials at local colleges say that decision won’t change the way they admit students.

“The student learning experience is enhanced when all students get to learn and interact with students of all races and ethnicities and socio-economic levels,” said David Wise, vice president of marketing and communications at Heritage University in Toppenish. “The outcome is better for all students because they develop empathy and understanding.”

Read more at YakimaHerald.com

Scoring college entrance tests, Yakima Herald-Republic, July 9, 2018

YAKIMA, Wash. — On various weekends during the upcoming school year, high school juniors across the Yakima Valley will cram into classrooms to take college entrance exams.

Taking those exams can be harrowing. Some students study endlessly for the SAT and ACT, thinking their chances of getting into college — and thus securing a financially stable future — ultimately hinge on their scores.

Read more at YakimaHerald.com.

Yakima Valley schools working to fill at least 65 open teaching positions, Yakima Herald-Republic, June 30, 2018

Michael Guaglianone teaching

Michael Guaglianone teaching math class at A.C. Davis High School in Yakima, Wash.

At the beginning of the 2015-16 school year, there were 36 unfilled teaching positions in the Yakima School District.

On the first day of school that year, the district pulled out all the stops to make sure those classrooms had teachers in them — several substitutes were called in, and administrators from the district office were sent to schools to teach. Even Superintendent Jack Irion prepared to spend the day teaching a math class, but a substitute for him was found at the last second.

Read more at YakimaHerald.com