MLS program graduates 12 new MLS professionals

The Heritage University Medical Laboratory Sciences Program celebrated the accomplishments of the Class of 2018 graduates during a ceremony at HU on August 17, 2018. HU President  Andrew Sund, PhD. congratulated each graduate as their names were called. The graduates welcomed the incoming cohort before the ceremony.

Check out pictures from the ceremony on Facebook.

 

 

 

Costco co-founder meets with Sinegal Family Foundation Scholars

Costco co-founder Jim Sinegal met with the first cohort of Sinegal Scholars at Heritage University last month. The students are the first five to receive full-ride Sinegal Family Foundation Scholarships at Heritage. A total of 20 students will earn their degrees through the scholarship program made possible by a $1.14 million gift from the Sinegal Family Foundation to Heritage last year.

Heritage alumni who now work at Costco headquarters will provide mentoring opportunities over the course of the year inclusive of a trip to meet with Costco executives and Jim Sinegal again next spring.

You can see pictures from the dinner on Facebook.

 

Portraits of Yakama Nation elders are now on display at Heritage

Portraits from three years of honoring Yakama Nation elders are now on display in the Violet Lumley Rau Center conference room at Heritage University. Each fall since 2015, four elders are recognized for their significant contributions to their community. The celebration is part of  the university’s observance of Native American Heritage Month. More portraits are to come as we continue this tradition.

Visit the Rau Center at Heritage University to see them for yourself!

HU classroom dedicated to longtime professor

A classroom at Heritage University is now named in honor of a longtime Heritage faculty member who retired two years ago for health reasons. More than 50 family, friends and supporters gathered for the heartwarming ceremony at Heritage last week  for the dedication of “The Professor Apanakhi Buckley Collaborative Classroom” located in Petrie Hall Room 1112.

Guests, and Apanakhi herself, heard testimonials from many who shared how she positively impacted their lives and the university.  Apanakhi taught at Heritage from 2000 to 2016, and in 2014 began using the room now named in her honor as a classroom. A glass sign outside the room now tells visitors the name of the room. The room is also temporarily decorated with indigenous artwork.

Pictures from the ceremony can be found on the Heritage University Facebook page.

 

Congratulations Class of 2018

Taking Flight

Taking FlightAfter years of sacrifice, of late night study sessions and countless hours spent in the library and computer labs, Heritage graduates celebrated earning their degree at the 2018 Commencement in May.

All totaled, 325 men and women earned their undergradaute and graduate degrees at Heritage this academic year.

In addition to Alvord’s address, two graduating students gave their remarks. Jesica Alvarez (B.A.,Chemistry) presented the baccalaureate student address and Alfredia Thompson, (M.I.T., Elementary Education) made the master’s degree student address.

Taking FlightThe Violet Lumley Rau Outstanding Alumni Award was given to Colleen Sheahan for her work establishing and running a private Christian school in Yakima. Fifteen graduates received the Board of Directors Academic Excellence Award, which is given to undergraduates who completed their degree with a perfect 4.0-grade point average. This year’s recipients were: Aryell Adams,Social Work; Kayli Berk, English/Language Arts; Aimee Bloom, Education; Meagan Gullum, Social Work; Tifanny Macias, Education; Daniela Medina, Education; Itzamary Montalvo, Education; Debra Olson, Education; Alexandra Orozco, Social Work; Perla Perez, Social Work; Karima Ramadan, Early Childhood Studies; Filipp Shelestovxskiy,  Education; Jessie Shinn, Accounting; Ana Tapia, Social Work; and Ashley Zahn, Education. The President’s Student Award of Distinction, which is given to an undergraduate with a distinguished record of academic excellence and service to the university, was given to Aleesa Bryant, Biomedical Science.

Taking FlightTaking FlightTaking FlightTaking Flight

A Campus Celebrates

Heritage University Inaugurates its Third President

Inauguration CelebrationA whirlwind of events in March brought together a campus and a community to celebrate the
inauguration of Heritage University’s third president, Dr. Andrew Sund.

Over the course of three days, the university hosted several events, each designed to celebrate different aspects of the university, its mission, and the people from the campus community and beyond.

“Inaugurations are as much a celebration of the universities and the communities that they serve, as they are of the incoming president,” said David Wise, vice president for marketing and advancement.Inauguration Celebration

The university opened its festivities with the President’s Inauguration Prelude, an event that honored its relationship with the Yakama Nation and the founding of the university by two Yakama women, Violet Lumley Rau and Martha Yallup, along with Sister Kathleen Ross. During the Prelude, the university dedicated the permanent installation of the Heritage teepee. The  teepee now serves as a learning center and is a significant part of the university campus.

Later that evening, the university moved its celebration to the Columbia Basin College (CBC) campus for a reception with faculty, staff, students, alumni and friends of the university. The event was an opportunity for those who are tied to the regional site to meet Dr. Sund and hear about his vision for the university and its partnership with CBC.

On its second day of the celebration, Heritage hosted educators from around the Yakima Valley at a luncheon with the president. The event brought together school counselors, principals, superintendents, as well as faculty from the university’s College of Education.

Inauguration CelebrationIn the evening, Heritage hosted the President’s Inauguration Jubilee at the Yakima Seasons Performance Hall. It was an arts and cultural event that celebrated the richness of the Yakima Valley and the people who call this area home. This multicultural repertoire of music, poetry,
and dance featured some of the Yakima Valley’s most talented artists. A mariachi band welcomed guests as they arrived and a pre-show reception featured a gallery filled with works by local artists and Heritage students.  Performances that night included a classical violin solo by Denise Dillenbeck, smooth jazz by the Yakima Valley College Jazz Ensemble, readings by poet Dan Peters, choral works by Inauguration Celebrationthe Yakima Symphony Chorus, traditional Native American dancing by The Four Seasons Travelers, pop and rock music by the Latino band Avión, and contemporary indie music by Naomi Wachira.

“The Jubilee was especially meaningful,” said Wise.  “The Yakima Valley is a vibrant tapestry of rich cultures, which was demonstrated through the performances at the Seasons. It was a beautiful night.”

Inauguration CelebrationThe celebrations capped off with the formal installation during a ceremony steeped in academic tradition. The event began with the grand procession of regalia-clad faculty, visiting dignitaries from other colleges and universities, members of the platform party, student representatives, and the Yakama Warriors color guard marching across campus from the Kathleen Ross snjm Center to Smith Family Hall in the Arts and Sciences Center. They marched down the aisle to a recording of the “Heritage University Tribute Anthem,” composed for the university by Joan McCusker, IHM and performed by the Yakima Symphony Orchestra. Davis Washines, chair of the Yakama General Council and Dr. Kathleen Ross, snjm each presented an invocation and Dr. Keith Watson, president of Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences, and Norm Johnson, WashingtonState Representative, 14th District (R) presented greetings. Inauguration CelebrationBefore representatives from the Student Government Association, Faculty Senate, Staff Educators Senate, and university alumni make their remarks, students from the Wapato High School Choir “En Vox” performed an interlude of choral music. They later sang the university’s alma mater Lift High the Banner! , written by Dr. Curtis L. Guaglianone and arranged by Aaron L. Jameson. David Cordova, friend and former colleague of Dr. Sund, made the introduction before Heritage Board of Directors Chair Pat Oshie presented Dr. Sund with the chain of office during the  Ceremony of Investiture.

During his presidential address, Dr. Sund shared his appreciation of the deep roots that the university has with the Yakama Nation and the importance of that relationship. He spoke of the importance of building academics that prepare students to meet the needs of the businesses in
the Yakima Valley.

“We can become even more of an institution that responds to the needs in the Valley for an educated population that serves the growth and benefit of this wonderful region, but also serves the aspirations of our students,” he said. “In doing that we will be successful.”

Dr. Sund joined Heritage University in July 2017. He succeeded Dr. John Bassett, who retired after serving as president for seven years.  President Sund came to Heritage University from St. Augustine College in Chicago, where he served as president from 2008 to 2017. Before St. Augustine, Dr. Sund was Dean of Workforce and Community Education at Olive Harvey College, one of the city colleges of Chicago, from 2004 to 2008.

Heritage University, PNWU entice students to science

Toppenish, Wash. –Heritage University and Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences have come together with the Mt. Adams School District and the Yakama Nation Tribal School to create a unique science-focused program for young people living on the homelands of the Yakama Nation.

The five-week long Summer Program for Yakama Students (SPYS) encourages and rewards young people in the Valley to enroll and succeed in science classes. Dr. Maxine Janis, president’s liaison for Native American affairs at Heritage University, and Dr. Mirna Ramos-Diaz, assistant professor of family medicine at PNWU, and Dr. Naomi Lee from Northern Arizona University created SPYS. Dr. Janis and Dr. Ramos-Diaz co-wrote a proposal to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and received notice of funding days before the program began in the Yakima Valley.

Summer Program for Yakama Students

First week of classes in the Summer Program for Yakama Students project at Heritage University

“I just want to emphasize that our collaboration is the only way this program is possible,” said Dr. Ramos-Diaz, SPYS co-director. “What makes my heart sing is the work from everybody so we could build this pathway program for our underrepresented youth.”

The intent of the program is simple – build and strengthen the scientific knowledge and motivation of students to enter the health sciences and do well in their science curriculum. Upon successful completion of the program, the high school students may be able to participate in a two-month internship at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the NIH in Bethesda, Maryland.

Dr. Janis and Dr. Ramos-Diaz have worked closely for years on both the summer internship program and the Roots To Wings program that involves both schools. “I am thrilled to be working with partners who feel as passionately as I do in developing programs that will benefit the Native peoples of our Valley.”

SPYS is a comprehensive science-based education program which integrates traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) as part of the curriculum. The program will also offer instruction on how to apply for college, seek scholarships and financial aid, and learn successful study habits. Local culture is also woven into the curriculum, such as incorporating the knowledge of various foods into the study of chemistry, and integrating Native traditions and values into science. “We know that combining culture with science makes the course of study more accepted by students, who in turn will do better in these types of programs,” said Ramos-Diaz.

The SPYS program is designed to provide opportunities for underrepresented youth to seek health professions pathways. Native Americans and Mexican-Americans under the age of 18 living on the Yakama Nation are participating in SPYS. Once they complete the program, these students will be in the position when they turn 18 to complete a competitive application for a summer internship at the NIH in Bethesda.

Summer Program for Yakama Students

First week of classes in the Summer Program for Yakama Students project at Heritage University

Guest lecturers from across the nation will join Heritage and PNWU faculty for SPYS. Dr. Rita Devine, program coordinator for NINDS and Dr. David Wilson, director of the Tribal Health Research Office at NIH will visit the students and observe their progress. Dr. Wilson’s office coordinates NIH research related to the health of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) at NIH institutes and centers. “Dr. Wilson’s presence at SPYS will bring a great deal of prestige to the program,” said Ramos-Diaz.

“The NIH always seeks to support pilot programs such as SPYS to demonstrate how underrepresented students in health sciences disciplines can conduct research that will impact health, disease and health care outcomes,” said Dr. Janis. “Support for the SPYS preparatory education program offers opportunities for our Native youth to become active participants as scholars in the health sciences.”

Heritage University in Toppenish will host the first week of SPYS beginning July 9, 2018. PNWU in Yakima, Wash. will host the second and third week, with the program returning to Heritage for the final two weeks.

For more information, contact:

Maxine Janis at (509) 865-0737 or Janis_M@Heritage.edu

Mirna Ramos-Diaz at (509) 249-7796 or MRamosDiaz@pnwu.edu

Going Greek

Fraternity and Sororities Set the Bar High in Academics and Service Over spring break, with classes on hiatus, a group of young men hunched over 30,000 plastic eggs, filling each with candy. Later they would scatter them around campus to the delight of hundreds of children who came for the third annual Easter Egg Extravaganza.  Sponsored by the Omega Delta Phi […]