Center for Intercultural Learning & Teaching

Our Center for Intercultural Learning & Teaching (CILT) supports the Heritage mission by enhancing the quality of student learning and faculty well-being.

Learn more about all of the ways we can provide support to our dedicated faculty and staff!


About Us

The Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching at Heritage University began in 2003 as an initiative of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Sneh Veena. Dr. Peter Frederick, (distinguished Visiting Scholar and Professor of History) and Professor Mary James (Assistant Professor of English and Humanities) developed the vision and framework for CILT’s operation and served as the first facilitators. The members of the Heritage faculty are indebted to these two leaders for the collaborative and supportive spirit that characterize the work of the Center.

When Dr. Frederick retired in 2006, Professor Ed Rousculp, formerly Chair of the Teacher Education Program, joined with Professor Mary James as co-facilitator in the Center. The Center sponsors a series of regularly scheduled faculty development opportunities focusing on research-based strategies, intercultural learning, student-centered approaches, meaningful use of instructional technology and examples of best practices from Heritage faculty.

In 2010, CILT’s ability to meet all aspects of its mission developed further through “Visiting Professors for Faculty Development in Native American and Hispanic Cultural Studies,” a project made possible by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The grant funded “the development of digital materials to enable faculty to insert content from visiting scholar’s presentations into future teaching of their courses and also preserve the [visiting professors’] valuable presentations for… the total campus” (Grant Summary, 2010, September 25).

You can learn more in an article by Peter Frederick and Mary James — “‘Heritage Rocks’:  Principles and Best Practices of Effective Intercultural Teaching and Learning” — published in the 25th anniversary volume of To Improve the Academy.

Frederick, Peter, and Mary James. “’Heritage Rocks’: Principles and Best Practices of Intercultural Teaching and Learning.” In To Improve the Academy: Resources for Faculty, Instructional, and Organizational Development, vol. 25, edited by Douglas R. Robertson and Linda B. Nilson. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing, 2007.

Our Mission

  • To support the Heritage mission and vision
  • To enhance the quality of student learning and faculty well-being
  • To affirm and nurture innovative, intercultural teaching practices
  • To intentionally link faculty development to student learning outcomes
  • To make visible the Heritage story of effective intercultural learning by gathering and disseminating illustrative stories

Our Services

Here are some of the ways we support our faculty and students!

  • Join us for faculty conversations/workshops on learning and teaching (and its intercultural aspects) — check back for announcements!
  • Invite us for a visit to your classroom and a follow-up descriptive, non-evaluative feedback conversation about shared teaching and learning issues and concerns —coffee/tea/soda is on us!
  • Participate in mid-semester classroom research and feedback on your students’ learning — watch for mid-semester feedback materials in your box or in an email message.
  • Request a professional development consultation on any learning or teaching issue with which you want help, including feedback on drafts of assignments, tests or syllabi.
  • Browse our professional development, career pathways and pedagogical materials — soon to be catalogued.
  • Clarify the links between the “Key Characteristics of Effective Teaching,” the student learning outcomes in your course and your own professional development goals —anticipate the annual review.
  • Tell our successes. Share your stories of effective (intercultural) classroom practice; invite us to interview you and write up the conversation for your review and possible publication!

While we have scheduled activities, we always welcome drop-in visits, phone calls, emails, collaboration and informal conversations at lunch. Contact us at your convenience! Our Center is for both part-time and full-time faculty.

We look forward to talking to you!


Events

Online Services
Virtual Help Desk on Collaborate: HU Online Classroom
Watch for the New Day of the Week and Time of Day

Our Center is ready to help!

  • Looking for new ideas to strengthen student learning in your class?
  • Want to add diverse perspectives to your coursework?
  • Interested in improving communication between students on sensitive topics?
  • Need practice with the technology available in your classroom?
  • Using lecture-capture technology or online classroom teaching for the first time?
  • Need ideas for meaningful ways to integrate technology into your classes?
  • Need a few tips about using MyHeritage or Chalk & Wire?

Call us for a referral!

Center Co-Facilitators and Affiliate Faculty Members

Ed Rousculp, Elizabeth Simkins, snjm
Hall, room 2108
509-945-3540
rousculp_e@heritage.edu

Mary James, Elizabeth Simkins, snjm
Hall, Room 2104
509-865-8564
james_m@heritage.edu

Ricardo Valdez
Affiliate Faculty Member
CTBC Bldg., Room 2204
509-865-8674
Valdez_R@heritage.edu


Faculty Resources

Need more information? Check out our additional resources available on YouTube:

First Generation University Students

From Where the Sun Rises: Addressing the Educational Achievement of Native Americans in Washington State

Understanding Opportunities to Learn for Latino Students in Washington

Faculty Accountability for Culturally Inclusive Pedagogy and Curricula

Insights Gained from Heritage Students and Faculty
Insights gained from observing and interacting with Heritage classes point to successful strategies, as well as challenges.

Research Related to Success of First Generation University Students
Helpful research to support efforts to meet the needs of first generation college students.

Research Related to Success of Transfer Students
Research to stimulate discussion of needs of transfer students and strategies to meet those needs.

High Impact Educational Practices and Outcomes of High Impact Practices for Underserved Students:  A Review of the Literature
 
Research supports the power of high impact practices, especially for first generation college students.

The “Ouch” Factor:  Managing Offensive Comments in Class
Four constructive strategies that have proved helpful for addressing offensive comments made in class.

Promoting Successful Learning Outcomes
Heritage professors share their strategies in these brief videos.

Faculty Development and Evaluation

Key Characteristics of Successful Heritage Faculty
The Key Characteristics were derived from observations of successful Heritage faculty and serve as the basis for faculty development and evauation.

Midterm Feedback Process and Instrument
Process has helped many faculty make beneficial mid-course adjustments.

Accessing Course Eval Results
Instructions for accessing student feedback from end-of-semester course evaluations.

Assessment

HU Core Themes and Assessment Questions
Everyone should be aware of the University’s Core Themes

University Goals and Key Assessment Indicators for Student Performance
Do you and your students know the University Goals and Key Assessment Indicators for your courses?

ePortfolio Vision Statement
What should the ePortfolio system do for students, faculty, and programs?  Only student, faculty, and program actions can realize the potential.

HU Assessment Handbook
Guidelines and procedures for the University assessment system

Guides for Using Instructional Technology

Beginning to Use MyHeritage: Guidelines for Faculty
A step-by-step guide for using the various portals in MyHeritage to support student learning and retention.

Faculty Guide to Assessing Key Assignments in the Chalk and Wire ePortfolio
Explains the process of setting up a student group and assessing key assignments.

Faculty Guide to Create a Course/Advisor Group
Explains the process of creating a course/advisor group to help students trace their progress.

Student Guide to Naming and Creating Your Portfolio
Step-by-step instructions for creating your Portfolio on MyHertiage to match your course(s) and provide the correct key assignments.

Student Guide for Registering an ePortfolio Account
The first handout to give students who are just purchasing their ePortfolio account and need to get started.

Student Guide for Uploading and Submitting Assignments in ePortfolio
Guides students through process of uploading, placing, and submitting assignments for assessment.

Student Guide for Locating Resources and Ruberics in ePortfolio
Helps students find the rubric for a particular key assignment along with accompanying resources, when available.

Student Guide for Reviewing Feedback on Assessed Work
Helps students easily access instructor feedback on previously submitted assignments.

Tutorial to Ease the Transition to Office 2010
This tutorial will help you switch from Office 2003 or Office 2007 to Office 2010.

Getting Started with Tegrity Lecture Capture

Resources for Developing Syllabi

Academic Calendar for current school year
Key dates for inclusion in course syllabi

Syllabus Template for Undergraduate Education
Standard format for syllabi written for undergraduate classes in the College of Education & Psychology

Syllabus Template for Graduate Education
Standard format for syllabi written for graduate classes in the College of Education & Psychology, excluding online classes.

Syllabus Template for Graduate Online Programs
Standard format for syllabi written for graduate online classes in the College of Education & Psychology.

Workshop Guide for reVisioning Course Syllabi
A guide in workshops facilitating significant revision of a course syllabus.

Videos are available on YouTube Channel


Grant Products

Check out our additional resources available for grant products:


Heritage Best Practices

Service Learning Project

Service Learning Project with Medical Lab Science Students Meets Community Need

“We saw an excellent opportunity for a service learning project in our isolated rural area, whiere few continuing education (CE) opportunities are available for our Medical Laboratory affiliates and recent graduates. 


Service Learning Project

With Medical Lab Science Students Meets Community Need

“We saw an excellent opportunity for a service learning project in our isolated rural area, where few continuing education (CE) opportunities are available for our Medical Laboratory affiliates and recent graduates. To address this need, we developed a project that provides students practical experience in education, resaerch, professional enculturation and teamwork. Each student researches and presents a topic at a community CE Day Seminar that is held at the University. Students attend our state society’s Spring CE Seminar for ideas and then work together to advertise, secure a sponsor, prepare program flyer, provide lunch and secure P.A.C.E.® approval for their sessions under the guidance and oversight of the program faculty.

MLS students are matched with graduate student mentors from the College of Education who help them with the preparation of an engaging lesson. Dress rehersals are conducted where students provide feedback to each other regarding the effectiveness of their presentations. We have presented the CE Day Seminar for two years. It was well received as indicated by the number and variety of attendees and their evaluation of the presentations. Our program is promoted in the community, students receive job offers from participants and affiliate mentors become energized working with the students on this project.

While the project takes time, student reflections indicate increased confidence and an overall sense of achievement. Valued experiences included a better understandign of the real work involved in the education process, a chance to develop their public speaking skills, and the enjoyment of networking with the laboratory community.”

Science Education: From Ivory Tower

Science Education:  From Ivory Tower into the Community with Reciprocal Learning

“For the past ten years, I have been back inside the ivory towers, a certified secondary science teacher and professor who has taught nearly 30 different university science course, the PI of a major NSF-STEP grant.


Into the Community with Reciprocal Learning

“For the past ten years, I have been back inside the ivory towers, a certified secondary science teacher and professor who has taught nearly 30 different university science courses, the PI of a mjaor NSF-STEP grant. I learned to assimilate youth into Western Science, and am very good at it…but to what end? Where are the university faculty willing to adapt to the cultures around them? Is it detachment or fear? Out there, control is…not always in the hands of faculty; as a learner, the one who is usually the teacher often becomes unvomfortable, won’t risk embarrassment, is unwilling to adapt. Many become nervous observers, but observation is not the same as experience, and most return to the towers never having tasted the water.”

— Dr. Greg VanDoren, Assistant Professor of Science, Heritage University, during a faculty presentation on November 17, 2010

Creative Visual Representations

Creative, Visual Representations of Students’ Reflections
Professor Mary James teaches Hum 305 Heritage Core, a required course for all transfer students.


Of Students’ Reflections

Professor Mary James teaches Hum 305 Heritage Core, a required course for all transfer students.  Heritage Core focuses on helping students experience the Heritage University mission through writing and intensive work in a cross-cultural experiences and communication.  Student reflection provides a window on the transferomational nature of these experiences.  Written reflections can be found in many face-to-face and online classes, but Professor James’ students also show the power of visual representations of their deep thinking and feeling in response to class assignments.  You will find here a description of the assignment, as well as several samples of students’ work.

Fractals in Cultural Expression

Fractals in Cultural Expression

Dr. Apanakhi Buckley participated in the 2009-2010 project dedicated to enhancing the use of the humanities across the curriculum at Heritage University and supported by a grant from the National Endowment of the Humanities.


Dr. Apanakhi Buckley participated in the 2009-2010 project dedicated to enhancing the use of the humanities across the curriculum at Heritage University and supported by a grant from the National Endowment of the Humanities. Dr. Buckley is Professor of Education and primarily teaches course in methods for teachign science and mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels. She shares here a PowerPoint program designed for her methods in mathematics course after participating in a seminar led by artists and author, Elizabeth Woody. She makes numerous connections between fractals and a variety of forms of cultural expression, sharing her own story in the process and inviting students’ stories as well.


Flip the Script

Intercultural Dialogue Workshops

With support through the Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching and the Title V grant, Dr. Joy Howard helped facilitate two student-led workshops on March 6 and 14 in the Arts and Sciences Building, Smith Family Hall.

Our Heritage students and faculty had a unique opportunity to connect with each other in an arts-based intercultural dialogue workshop series. In this workshop, students presented their student stories of motivations, challenges and visions for the future at Heritage.

Jasper Luna, Carlos Hernandez, San Juanita Valdez, Jacob Billy, Jessica Whitteplume, Clemente Navarro, Heber Molina and Luis Gomez shared their stories through spoken word, poetry, visual art, video gaming, photography, dance and storytelling.

After the presentations, faculty members were able to dialogue with the students, which led into a final “What’s next work session” on March 27. In the final session, faculty, staff and students identified action-oriented plans for the future.

We look forward to more “Flip the Script” events in the upcoming semesters. Check back for the next workshop dates!

Contact Us

Ed Rousculp
Director CILT, Associate Professor
(509) 865-8622
Rousculp_E@heritage.edu

Mary James
Associate Dean College of Arts & Sciences
(509) 865-8564
James_M@heritage.edu

CILT Is Ready To Help

  • Looking for new ideas to strengthen student learning in your class?
  • Want to add diverse perspectives to your coursework?
  • Interested in improving communication between students on sensitive topics?
  • Need practice with the technology available in your classroom?
  • Having problems using the instructor’s station?
  • Using Tegrity or Collaborate for the first time?
  • Need ideas for meaningful ways to integrate technology into your classes?
  • Need a few tips about using MyHeritage or Chalk & Wire?