Heritage University and Behavior & Law Corp. sign collaboration agreement to deliver behavioral sciences training courses in the United States

Heritage University and Behavior & Law Corp. sign collaboration agreement to deliver behavioral sciences training courses in the United States

 

Heritage University and Behavior & Law Corp., one of the leading online training companies in Europe and Latin America, have signed a collaboration agreement to expand Behavior & Law training courses in the United States.

Heritage, an accredited, private, nonprofit university, located in Toppenish, Washington, was founded in 1982 to improve societal progress through education; empowering a multi-cultural and inclusive student body to overcome the social, cultural, economic, and geographic barriers that limit access to higher education.  Located on the homelands of Yakama Nation, the University embraces transformational student-centered education that cultivates leadership and a commitment to the promotion of a more just society.  Heritage offers more than 40 undergraduate and graduate degree programs and boasts more than 10,000 alumni.

Behavior & Law Corp. was created in 2010 as an entity specializing in the training, scientific research, and dissemination of Behavioral and Forensic Sciences. It offers six master’s programs, five university expert courses, and fourteen university advanced courses, with more than 1,000 students enrolled each year, worldwide.  Behavior & Law utilizes participative and innovative teaching methodology to ensure student learning in a virtual setting.

With headquarters in Clearwater, Florida (USA) and Madrid (Spain), Behavior & Law collaborates with various public and private entities around the world, including universities and different state security forces to develop the most up-to-date curricula and effective teaching methods. They are experts in Behavioral Science Training (Profiling and Forensic Science, Negotiation, Non-Verbal Communication, and Behavioral Economics) and its application. Their goal is to train qualified professionals that lead to improved working conditions and overall job satisfaction in their professional environments.

Behavior & Law, like Heritage, has a marked social justice mission, dedicated to a more just and safe society.  Their work is guided by three main pillars: scientific research, training, and dissemination of behavioral sciences.

Heritage and Behavior & Law are beginning their collaboration to provide training in behavioral sciences. They are currently working on the implementation of online training programs that will be offered in both Spanish and English in the United States through the Heritage Workforce Development unit.

For more information, please contact David Wise at (414) 788-0686 or wise_d@heritage.edu or Silvestre Cabezas, Marketing and Communication Manager at  (786) 533-3069 or cabezas@behaviorandlaw.com

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Honoring Our Elders

Each November, Heritage University celebrates Native American Heritage Month by recognizing four Yakama tribal elders for their lifetime contributions to their community.

Please click here to visit our page honoring this year’s tribal elders.

Heritage University students work to create awareness of missing and murdered indigenous people, Yakima Herald-Republic, December 9, 2019

Steven Escalera points to photos from the Dec. 1 vigil at the Toppenish Community Center for missing and murdered indigenous people, displayed along with flyers about missing people / Tammy Ayer, Yakima Herald Republic

TOPPENISH — In making a class presentation on missing and murdered indigenous women on the Yakama reservation, Christen Hoptowit Rivera and two fellow Heritage University students wanted to raise awareness of the issue.

Read the full story at YakimaHerald.com.

Social Scene: El Grito de Independencia at Heritage University, Yakima Herald-Republic, September 19, 2018

Heritage University in Toppenish hosted an El Grito de Independencia celebration on Saturday, September 15th, 2018.  (Leann Jones / Contributed)

View the gallery at yakimaherald.com.

Heritage University hosts festival for Mexican Independence Day, Yakima Herald-Republic, September 5, 2018

TOPPENISH, Wash. — Heritage University will host a cultural festival in honor of Mexican Independence Day next week.

The festival, called “El Grito de Independencia,” will commemorate what’s known as the “The Cry of Dolores,” when a Roman Catholic priest in the Mexican city of Dolores Hidalgo rang the bell of his church and gave the call to arms that triggered the Mexican War of Independence in 1810.

Read more at yakimaherald.com.

Heritage University receives $1.5M scholarship endowment for Native American students, KIMA-TV, September 5, 2018

TOPPENISH, Wa. — Heritage University is helping Native American students reach their educational goals with a $1.5 million scholarship endowment.

Ida Moses-Hypeer is a Senior at Heritage University and she is majoring in business with the help of several scholarships from the school.

“Blessing and also really helpful because, including myself, when you’re having these many scholarships all I want to think about right now is to learn,” said Moses-Hypeer.

Watch the story at kimatv.com.

Heritage University reaches goal to create scholarship endowment for Native American students, KAPP-TV, August 29, 2018

TOPPENISH, Wash. – A $650,000 donation has allowed Heritage University to reach its goal of creating a $1.5 million endowment for Native American student scholarships.

courtesy KAPP-TV

They recently received the grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

It will be combined with matching funds from the Johnson Scholarship Foundation and other private donors, to create the endowment which supports scholarships for indigenous students studying business and entrepreneurship.

Read more at YakTriNews.com.

Heritage University and PNWU collaborate to prepare students for health science careers, Yakima Herald-Republic, July 24, 2018

The sweet smell of strawberries lingered as students wearing white lab coats and rubber gloves carefully mashed the fruit inside small plastic bags.

Seated at long tables in the classroom at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences this month, the 10 young men and women from the Yakama Nation Tribal School and the Mt. Adams School District were performing an experiment as part of the inaugural Summer Program for Yakama Students.

Read more at YakimaHerald.com.

A student in the Summer Program for Yakama Students (SPYS) extracts DNA from strawberries as part of the program which prepares young people for careers in health science

Diversity outreach belongs on campus (editorial), Yakima Herald-Republic, July 15, 2018

Reaction from local universities to the Trump administration’s recent retraction of Obama-era “guidance” promoting diversity in the admissions process turned out to be something slightly more than a collective shoulder shrug but far less than an Edvard Munch “The Scream”-like freak out.

As it should be.

Read more at YakimaHerald.com.

Jumping the urban-rural divide through digital stories, Walla Walla Union-Bulletin, July 11, 2018

Digital storytelling came to Walla Walla this summer, through a partnership between Whitman College and Heritage University in Toppenish, Wash.

Over a period of several weeks, nearly two dozen students — equal populations from both schools — worked together in a new, place-based storytelling project called Rural American Digital Lab, or RADLab, as it got nicknamed.

Read more at union-bulletin.com.