Heritage University receives $5 million federal grant to support STEM students at HU and at Portland State University

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Heritage University awarded $5 million National Science Foundation grant to support STEM students at Heritage and Portland State University

Toppenish, Wash. – Heritage University has received a $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to support high-achieving, low-income students majoring in STEM fields at Heritage and Portland State University (PSU) in Oregon. The grant will fund a program titled Engagement Achievement and Graduation for Low-incomE Students, or “EAGLES,” and will provide scholarships to cover tuition for at least 116 students in STEM majors, including environmental science, engineering, ecology, chemistry, and biology at both campuses.

EAGLES will accomplish three objectives. The first will be to increase enrollment and retention of low-income and other under-represented groups in STEM fields; the second will be to develop an integrated structure to mentor, advise and engage these students in research and outreach activities focused on community-based challenges associated with environmental pollution; and the third will be to examine the impact of instructional interventions in introductory STEM courses and to fine-tune culturally-responsive learning procedures aimed at developing undergraduate students’ science identity and sense of community. With annual career panels at both Heritage and PSU, additional support services, research experiences, and coursework, EAGLES will not only provide scholarships for biology, environmental science and studies, and chemistry students but will also enhance learning opportunities. EAGLES will fill existing gaps at HU in the STEM pathway by allowing Heritage pre-engineering students to pursue bachelor’s degrees in civil and environmental engineering at PSU and giving them access to PSU career placement services and graduate programs.

Heritage Associate Professor Alexander Alexiades, Ph.D. is the principal investigator along with his counterpart at PSU, Dr. Gwynn Johnson. Alexiades will oversee the EAGLES program at Heritage. He is excited about the STEM opportunities for Heritage students, and for the possibility for the EAGLES model to be used at other campuses across the country.

“The research and service-learning activities conducted by our students will address authentic local and regional issues and strengthen community connections, and these results will demonstrate a model worthy of national replication for increasing enrollment, retention, and graduation in STEM majors and development of the sense of science identity needed in further studies and/or careers in the environmental sciences and engineering.”

Heritage Provost Dr. Kazuhiro Sonoda said this NSF award, when combined with other recent NSF grants (including a $2.5 million announced in June and a $350K grant for research experiences for undergraduates), the university is well-positioned to help STEM students for the next five years. “Heritage University and PSU campuses serve some of the nation’s highest-need students,” said. Sonoda. “These awards make it possible for us to create a comprehensive support system for our STEM students, and I’m very excited about the opportunities these grants will help us bring to them.”

The EAGLES program at HU and PSU will begin in September of this year and run through September 2024. For more information, contact David Mance, media relations coordinator at Heritage University at (509) 969-6084 or Mance_D@heritage.edu.

 

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Heritage University to host El Grito de Independencia to honor Mexican Independence Day for second year in a row

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Heritage University to host El Grito de Independenciato honor Mexican Independence Day for second year in a row

Toppenish, Wash. – Heritage University is hosting El Grito de Independencia, a Mexican cultural festival in honor of the Mexican Independence Day for the second year in a row.El Grito de Independencia will take place at the Heritage campus on Saturday, September 14, 2019 from 4:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. El Grito de Independencia commemorates the “Cry of Dolores,” a historical event in Mexico that set off the Mexican War of Independence from Spain and will be reenacted at 7:45 p.m.

The festivalwill have fun for the entire family, including games and piñatas for kids, food and beverages, traditional dancers, mariachis and live music. The event is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Melissa Hill at (509) 865-0411 or Hill_M@Heritage.edu.

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Heritage University awarded $2.5 million National Science Foundation grant to increase the number of Hispanic and Native American students in STEM workforce

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Heritage University awarded $2.5 million National Science Foundation grant to increase the number of Hispanic and Native American students in STEM workforce

Toppenish, Wash. – Heritage University and its partners will use a $2.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI) Program for “CRESCENT,” a project to increase the number of Hispanic and Native American students in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workforce. CRESCENT, which stands for “Culturally Responsive Education in STEM”, will combine innovative strategies for professional development of STEM faculty, STEM curriculum enhancement through institutional partnerships, offering experiential learning to students through hands-on research experiences and community outreach, and development of intensive culturally-responsive student support services to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing higher education in STEM disciplines.

CRESCENT will be led by Heritage University faculty Dr. Jessica Black, the Director of the Center for Indigenous Health, Culture & the Environment and the Chair of the Department of Natural Sciences. The program will incorporate students’ unique cultural strengths in the STEM Student Learning Intervention (SSLI) wrap-around services, combining near-peer mentoring, intensive advising, enhanced tutoring, undergraduate research training, and leadership development activities for engaging and supporting underrepresented minority (URM) students in learning. “We have many talented and driven students in our region who are interested in pursuing STEM careers but can sometimes struggle on their journeys and become discouraged. The CRESCENT program is designed to support these students throughout their pathway from high school to graduate school”, said Black.  “CRESCENT program activities will also empower faculty to develop innovative teaching strategies for instructing our diverse students and prepare the next generation of global citizens with a breadth of knowledge and essential life skills to succeed in the rapidly changing environment of the 21stcentury”.

The CRESCENT program will also investigate factors influencing STEM gatekeepers at the most influential and critical educational transitions that are limiting URM student engagement and advancement into STEM careers, testing innovative models transforming these gatekeepers into positive forces. Other goals include expanding a sustainable collaborative network with regional high schools to increase the pool of URM STEM-prepared first-generation freshmen undergraduate students, increase the number of URM student interested in STEM disciplines, improve the performance and retention of URM STEM students, and increase the number of URM students who pursue graduate studies in STEM disciplines after completion of their undergraduate degrees. The project will generate new knowledge on how to improve the retention and graduation of these students, and the outcomes will be shared with other HSIs seeking to grow their numbers of successful students.

Other HU faculty involved with CRESCENT include Dan Sisk, engineering professor and Dr. David Laman, chemistry professor. Project partners will include Dr. Naidu Rayapati, professor/plant pathologist and Director of the Washington State University Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center (IAREC) in Prosser, Dr. Rodney Cooper, research entomologist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture office in Wapato, and Dr. Matthew Loeser, biology faculty at Yakima Valley College. The CRESCENT program will be funded from September 2019 through August 2024.

For more information contact David Mance at (509) 969-6084 or mance_d@heritage.edu.

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Seven-year accreditation reaffirmation reflects Heritage University’s commitment to higher education for all

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 Seven-year accreditation reaffirmation reflects Heritage University’s commitment to higher education for all

Toppenish, Wash. – Heritage University President Dr. Andrew Sund announced two recent milestones that demonstrate Heritage University’s commitment to delivering higher education opportunities for all people of the Yakima Valley. The first, the reaffirmation of Heritage University’s accreditation by the Northwest Commission of Colleges and Universities (NWCCU) for another seven years, and the second, the adoption of a board-approved strategic plan for the University’s growth and continuous quality improvement through the year 2022.

Accreditation is a process of recognizing educational institutions for performance, integrity, and quality that entitles them to the confidence of the educational community and the public. Eight accreditation evaluators visited Heritage University for five days in early April to review the institution’s seven-year self-evaluation report. Following their visit, the evaluators commended Heritage in five areas:

  1. The deep commitment of its faculty, staff, and administrators to the mission of the University, which guides them in outstanding support of transformative, student-centered education, developing leaders who embrace social justice and community engagement.
  2. Its dedicated, data-driven efforts to support student access and equity, as exemplified by the summer Math Bridge and English Academy programs that have enabled hundreds of students to advance from developmental to college-level study.
  3. The Center for Intercultural Learning and Teaching’s (CILT) dedication to the delivery of high quality and continuous faculty development in areas of program review and assessment, the use of classroom technology, cultural responsiveness and care of students, and pedagogy that supports academic excellence for all students.
  4. The culture of assessment among its professionally accredited undergraduate and graduate-level majors and programs.
  5. Its Board of Directors for advancing the mission of Heritage University through its strong leadership, engagement, advocacy, philanthropic support, and discerning recruitment of new members to the Board.

In a letter to Dr. Sund reaffirming Heritage University’s accreditation, NWCCU President Sonny Ramaswamy stated “The NWCCU is committed to an accreditation process that adds value to institutions while contributing to public accountability. This action was taken after consideration of the evidence, including the institution’s Self Evaluation Report, the Peer-Evaluation Report, and information received as part of the institutional representative meeting with NWCCU Commissioners.”

Dr. Sund represented Heritage at the NWCCU Commission meeting in Park City, Utah last month at which the Chair of the visiting team officially presented her report to the Commission. “I am happy to report that the commission accepted the report of the visiting team with no additional comments. It is a reflection of our faculty and staff’s ongoing commitment to achieving the Heritage mission and that we meet the Commission’s expectations for complying with the accreditation criteria,” said Dr. Sund. “The accreditation renewal reinforces our conviction in the Heritage mission to empower a multi-cultural and inclusive student body to overcome the social, cultural, economic and geographic barriers that limit access to higher education embracing a transformational student-centered education that cultivates leadership and a commitment to the promotion of a more just society. We will continue to support the initiatives that made the university what it is and develop new programs that are responsive to the needs of students and the Yakima Valley community we serve.”

Recent initiatives demonstrating the University’s commitment to the valley include:

  1. Strengthening the University’s relationship with Yakama Nation: This year instituting the Full Circle Scholarship which allows enrolled members of the Yakama Nation to attend Heritage with no out of pocket expense for tuition.
  2. Reinforcing alliances with both Yakima Valley College and Columbia Basin College to make seamless the transfer process for their students.
  3. Adding the Heritage@Work, workforce development unit, to enhance training and development opportunities for local industries in preparing their employees for increasingly challenging positions within their organizations.
  4. Enhancing the University’s partnership with Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences (PNWU) through shared programs including the Master of Arts in Medical Sciences (MAMS) and the Master of Science in Physician Assistant (MSPA): Both preparing graduates to succeed as innovative leaders in the delivery of healthcare in the Yakima Valley and nationwide.
  5. Developing closer ties with Valley High Schools: Students can participate in the University’s “New Horizons” program that allows their students to earn college credit while still in high school at no cost; and establishing a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Yakima School District (YSD) to become the primary provider of free college credits for College in the High School classes for YSD’s A.C. Davis and Eisenhower students.

The Strategic Plan adopted by HU’s 30-member board of directors in June lays out a roadmap for growth and continuous quality improvement at Heritage through December 31, 2022. The initiatives embraces are directed at growing the offering of services to students. These include implementing programs to meet the transportation, health resources and nutritional needs of students; completing a feasibility study on having on-campus housing; and implementing a sports program. “I’ve been blessed to work with faculty and staff who are dedicated to designing programs that further our mission,” said Dr. Sund. “Thousands have trusted this institution to transform their lives through their Heritage experience, and our strategic plan and renewed accreditation only embolden our intention to do just that.”

In addition to regional accreditation of the University, several programs at Heritage are accredited by accrediting bodies responsible for certifying competency in specific programs. They are as follows:

Medical Laboratory Science: The MLS program at Heritage is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Lab Sciences (NAACLS).

Education: State of Washington approval through the Professional Education Standards Board (PESB) has been granted to the following education programs: Residency Teacher; and Residency Principal/Program Administrator.

Nursing: The baccalaureate degree program in nursing at Heritage University is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 655 K Street, NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20001, 202-887-6791. It is also approved by the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission.

Social Work: The Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.) degree was accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) effective with the class of 1997. The program was re-accredited in 2019.

Physician Assistant: At its September 2018 meeting, the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA) extended Accreditation-Probation status for the Heritage University Physician Assistant program until its next review in September 2020.

For more information, contact David Mance at (509) 969-6084 or mance_d@heritage.edu.

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Heritage University announces first-ever “Eagle Giving Day” June 27 to boost student scholarships

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Heritage University announces first-ever “Eagle Giving Day” June 27 to boost student scholarships

Toppenish, Wash. – Heritage University friends, donors, and alumni will have the opportunity to help make college possible for countless students by participating in the university’s first-ever “Eagle Giving Day” on Thursday, June 27. Every dollar raised during this one-day online fundraising campaign will go directly to student scholarships.

David Wise, VP of Advancement and Marketing at HU, said the university has been blessed by generous supporters who believe in the Heritage mission of providing students an opportunity to earn a college degree regardless of race, ethnicity or socioeconomic status. “Nearly every student who has ever attended Heritage has had scholarship support thanks to the generosity of our amazing donors. If there is one constant in this valley it is the belief that education offers the best mechanism to transform lives, and the women and men of the Yakima Valley have demonstrated this belief through their giving,” said Wise. “All of us are lifted up when we provide those who are most in need, with the opportunity to pursue their dreams.”

HU alumni are also being invited to help provide scholarships to students who are following in their footsteps. Alumni will be able to support students in the programs of their choice. “Social workers can give to social work majors, teachers can give to education majors, nurses can give to nursing majors, and so on,” said Wise. “It is not the size of the gift that matters, lots of small gifts add up to really big opportunities for students. And as added incentive an anonymous alum has agreed to match every gift up to the first $5,000!“

Gifts can be made before and through June 27 using Heritage University’s secure online donation form at heritage.edu/givingday, or by calling (509) 865-8587.

For more information contact David Mance at (509) 855-0731 or mance_d@heritage.edu.

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Heritage University to host week-long career-enhancing seminar for Yakima Valley teachers

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Heritage University to host week-long career-enhancing seminar for Yakima Valley teachers

Toppenish, Wash. – Yakima Valley teachers will gain insight into the science of how children learn, and learn how to re-engage their students as part of the Summer Institute Neuroscience of Learningat Heritage University July 15-19. In this immersive course, a framework and foundation in evidence-based Neuroscience is taught that empowers educators. Teachers will gain insight into the science behind how children learn and will be given practical and proven skills to identify and re-engage students.

The Summer Institute Neuroscience of Learning is a program of Neural Education, Institute for Connecting Neuroscience with Teaching and Learning. Its founder, Kieran O’Mahony, Ph.D., FRGS, is a learning sciences fellow with the University of Washington College of Education LIFE (Learning in Informal and Formal Environments) Center. The LIFE Center was the first Science of Learning Center funded by the National Science Foundation whose primary objective was to investigate social, cognitive and neuroscience of how people learn. “Education in America has stagnated, as efforts to raise education levels during the last 50 years have gone nowhere,” said Dr. O’Mahony. “By using a neural lens, we can positively affect our education deficiencies by giving teachers tools and practices that align with how the brain works and how children learn.”

Neural Education aims to enhance education outcomes by inspiring teachers to ignite their classroom using research-based brain science methodologies which allow them to manage the classroom by managing the brain; provide K-12 professional development to help educators realize a new paradigm – a way of thinking about teaching and learning using a neural lens; translate neuro-scientific research (how the brain processes and retains information) into accessible practices and processes; and improve educational outcomes for all students by empowering them to access their own potential as they understand themselves and see themselves as learners. O’Mahony is passionate about how these new methodologies have changed the learning world since the Decade of the Brainin the early years of this century. “It shocked me to realize that for all my years in the classroom, I hadn’t taken any classes on how the human brain works or how children’s brains learn. Today, teachers get to understand the organ that is most influential in learning—the cognitive machinations of each brain—as we create learning spaces that work in their schools.”

“In order to overcome these education deficiencies which may leave anxious and disengaged students behind, we need a new perspective that breaks free of the current system that isn’t working,” said Kari Terjeson, the Chair of the Department of Teacher Education at Heritage University. “Neural educators view teaching and learning as collaborative practices that grow cognitive capacity with the goal of helping every student reach their full potential.”

Heritage University will host the basic summer institute during the week of July 15-19. Participants will learn how to create a stress-free classroom, eliminate disciplinary referrals, increase academic performance and help students self-engage with voice and agency. The Basic Institute cost is normally $995, but with every teacher being sponsored at 90%, the final cost is $99.50, and those who complete the week will earn 35 clock hours.

To register for theSummer Institute Neuroscience of Learning, visit Neuraleducation.org.For more information, contact David Mance at (509) 865-0731 or mance_d@heritage.edu.

 

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Pacific Power Foundation gives $3,000 grant to Heritage University for student scholarships

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Pacific Power Foundation gives $3,000 grant to Heritage University for student scholarships

Toppenish, Wash. – Heritage University is pleased to announce it has once again been awarded a $3,000 grant from the Pacific Power Foundation. This is the fourth year in a row Heritage has received the grant, which will be used to fund scholarships for students pursuing degrees in the health sciences and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) fields.

David Wise, VP of Advancement and Marketing for Heritage, was presented with a grant check from Lori Froehlich, regional business manager of the Pacific Power Foundation on June 5. “I am grateful for Pacific Power Foundation’s continued support of Heritage University’s mission of providing educational opportunities for students of the Yakima Valley. This generous grant will help the students who have the drive but not the financial means to obtain the education that prepares them for exciting and rewarding careers in health sciences and STEM, two of the fastest-growing industries today,” said Wise.

Pacific Power Foundation’s Lori Froehlich presents a check to Heritage University’s David Wise

Froehlich said Pacific Power Foundation supports Heritage University’s mission of making a college education accessible to anyone with the talent and drive to pursue a degree is in close alignment to the Foundation’s support for projects that best serve community interests. “We’ve seen how communities across the nation strive to bolster its numbers of technology and healthcare workers. We are happy to support Heritage and its work to prepare students to thrive in these important fields.”

For more information, contact David Wise at (509) 865-0717 or wise_d@heritage.edu.

About the Pacific Power Foundation

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created in 1988 by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 1.8 million customers in six Western states as Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington, and California) and Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming and Idaho). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Pacific Power and Rocky Mountain Power. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

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Bounty of the Valley Scholarship Dinner raises over $745,000 for student scholarships

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Annual Heritage University event raises $745,000 for student scholarships

 

Toppenish, Wash. – The Bounty of the Valley Scholarship Dinner, the premier annual event in the Yakima Valley dedicated to raising scholarship funds for Heritage University students, brought in $742,275 this past weekend. Gifts continue to pour in as an additional $3,200 has arrived for a grand total of $745,475 as of Wednesday.

This year marked the 33rd anniversary of the event that celebrates the many talented men and women who are transforming their lives, and our communities, enabled by the gifts of the generous individuals who make it possible for them to earn their college degrees.

Heritage University students served as hosts for the 250 guests of the event, welcoming them as they arrived on campus, sharing their Heritage experiences and expressing their gratitude for their ongoing investment in the university. Shelby Clark, who served as the event’s student speaker, is a 2019 graduate of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program and has been accepted into the prestigious and highly competitive Doctor of Nursing Program at the University of Washington. Clark says she’s grateful for the opportunities she’s received, which were made possible by the generosity of Heritage University supporters. “It was gifts like yours which allowed me to be in a position to make life-changing discoveries,” she said in her speech to donors. “Thank you for believing that Heritage students are worthy.”

Jim Barnhill, a longtime champion of Heritage University, was overjoyed by the generosity he witnessed from longtime donors and new supporters. “Every year this event is spectacular and every year it just gets better and better,” said Barnhill. “The people of this valley believe in the power of education. By donating to scholarships, we are investing in our community as these students will go on to become professionals in the medical, education and business fields who will work here and become the next generation of leaders in the Yakima Valley,” he said.

Since its inception 33 years ago, more than $6 million has been raised at the event, with every dollar going directly to student scholarships. Senior Director of Donor Development and organizer of the Bounty of the Valley, Dana Eliason, said it’s an amazing experience to watch our donor community and our students get together at this event year after year. “The bond that is formed between students and donors is magical. Our donors get to see their investment in Heritage come alive by meeting our students,” she said.

To make a donation to student scholarships, visit http://www.heritage.edu/giving/donate-now/and select “Scholarship Dinner Fund” from the Designation drop down menu. For more information contact Dana Eliason at (509) 865-0441 or eliason_d@heritage.edu.

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Heritage University announces Spring 2019 Dean’s List

 

Heritage University Announces Spring 2019 Dean’s List

 

Toppenish, Wash. –  The following are students who earned a place on the Heritage University Dean’s List for the spring 2019 semester.  To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must be full-time, matriculated undergraduates who have earned semester grade point averages of 3.5 or better.

 

Marixa Abarca-Perez, Kennewick Gissell Aguilar, Grandview Amalia Akagi, Yakima
Paulina Alcala, Yakima Brettagne Aleck, Toppenish Sonia Allende, Pasco
Danielle Almanza, Granger Lorena Alvarez, Wapato Yanett Alvarez, Yakima
Maritza Alvarez, Sunnyside Yessyca Alvarez, Grandview Eilee Andujo, Prosser
Adrian Araiza, Yakima Rosalinda Arreola, Toppenish Alonso Arroyo, Wapato
Alejandra Arteaga, Yakima Kimberly Avalos, Toppenish Emma Avalos, Yakima
Clarissa Bahe, Yakima Regina Baker, Toppenish Jeremiah Baker, Toppenish
Hema Balderas, Wapato Yosi Barajas, Yakima Junior Barrera Bucio, Buena
Franchesca Bazan, Selah Elizabeth Benitez, Kennewick Esther Bermudez, Kennewick
Alyson Blair, Kennewick Jeanne Blakeman, Pasco Alyssa Buck, Mattawa
Justin Burke, Yakima Juan Cabrera-Santos, Buena Ruben Calvario, Wapato
Jennifer Cantu, Prosser Roma Cantu, Toppenish Alexandra Cardenas, Toppenish
Janette Cardona, Mattawa Brenda Cardona, Mattawa Jenny Careaga, West Richland
Delia Castanon, Wapato Leslie Castillo, Sunnyside Erica Castro, Wapato
Zachary Catron, Wapato Noelia Causor, Yakima Jocelyn Celis Torres, Wapato
Jennifer Cervantes, Toppenish Kevin Cervantes, Pasco Lizbeth Chavez, Pasco
Diana Chavez Cerda, Yakima Ruben Chino Bustamante, Toppenish Heather Christensen, Richland
Ana Cisneros Chavez, Outlook Shelby Clark, White Swan Gardenia Contreras-Vazquez, Sunnyside
Grace Corning, Benton City Melissa Correa, Pasco Esmeralda Correa, Pasco
Guadalupe Cortes, Wapato Almarosa Cortez, Wapato Kristina Cortez, Moxee
Estefani Cruz, Wapato Veronica Cruz, Sunnyside Vanessa Cruz, Pasco
Brenda Cruz, Granger Stefany Cuaspud Guevara, Kennewick Samuel Cuevas-Carrillo, Grandview
Tamara Cyr, Wapato Ashley Davis, Naches Xavier Day, Toppenish
Connie Delacruz, Yakima Fatima Delgado, Toppenish Esperanza Delgado, Toppenish
Paige Delp, Yakima Jesus Diaz, Zillah Keila Diaz, Granger
Josue Diaz, Mesa Mercedes Diaz, Toppenish Rylie Dixon, Kennewick
Amanda Donelson, Kennewick Taylor Ebbelaar, Grandview Crecenciana Espinoza, Pasco
Nora Espinoza, Yakima Jocelyne Espinoza, Wapato Kaylyn Fairchild, Pasco
Krisana Fernandez, Sunnyside Spencer Fisher, Richland Artemio Flores, Toppenish
Stephanie Flores-Landin, Yakima Antonio Franco, Granger Isela Fuentes, Yakima
Jocelyn Galarza, Zillah Leticia Garcia, Granger Evelyn Garcia, Wapato
Victoria Garcia, Pasco Rosa Garcia, Kennewick Marlenne Garibay, Sunnyside
Kimberling Garibay, Sunnyside Dorothy Garwood, Prosser Lorenzo Garza, Othello
Anahi Garza, Richland Lindsy Gatewood, Pasco Nicole Glatt, Burbank
Sarah Gold, Bellevue Lesly Gomez, Yakima Tania Gomez, Pasco
Isabel Gomez Carrillo, Wapato Carmen Gonzales, Toppenish Diana Gonzalez, Kennewick
Eduardo Gonzalez, Grandview Claudia Gonzalez, Grandview Noe Gonzalez, Toppenish
Alfonso Gonzalez-Colin, Yakima Bianca Gonzalez-Estrada, Wapato Heather Gooss, Moxee
Heidy Granados Lopez, Kennewick Ashley Grego, Richland Shelby Groth, Selah
Brenda Guadarrama, Granger Sonia Guerrero, Toppenish Isaias Guerrero, Outlook
Estefania Guerrero Angel, Granger Yazmine Guido, Yakima Eva Guizar, Kennewick
Gricelda Guizar Gaitan, Yakima Kaylyn Gunnier, Zillah Alissa Gutierrez, Yakima
Yuli Guzman, Yakima Martha Guzman, Yakima Alexis Guzman, Pasco
Melissa Guzman, Pasco Kori Haubrich, Sunnyside Anna Hempel, Kennewick
Mayra Hermosillo, Prosser Elena Hernandez, Wapato Yaritza Hernandez, Yakima
Xochitl Hernandez, Pasco Noemi Hernandez, Pasco Lizbeth Hernandez Islas, Yakima
Pete Herron, Yakima Tracie Hicks, Kennewick Savannah Hill, Wapato
Christina Holland, Kennewick Chaelee Hudson, Yakima Kasey Hutto, Kennewick
Samanta Jimenez, Pasco Alondra Juarez, Wapato Ekman Kaur, Kennewick
Wendy Kleppin, West Richland Viktoriia Konko, Kennewick Valentyn Konko, Kennewick
Marna Kostelecky, Burbank Michael Kummer, Kennewick Rachel LaBelle, Benton city
Jiovanna Lamas, Wapato Maria Lechuga, Wapato Shiraz Lefeber, Pasco
Yovana Leyva Carmona, Wapato Ilse Leyva Manzanarez, Yakima Idalis Licea, Zillah
Andres Lima Elias, Othello Mark Litka, Richland Brittany Loeken, Yakima
Elvira Lopez, Toppenish Yesenia Lopez, Wapato Yezie Lopez-Perez, Yakima
Daisy Luna, Wapato Jennifer Macias, Toppenish Claudia Madrigal, Pasco
Yareli Madrigal Luna, Pasco Mariby Magana, Yakima Marlene Magana, Sunnyside
Herminia Magdaleno, Yakima Kaitlin Maier, Richland Richelle Maki, Kennewick
Edgar Maranon, Wapato Elisa Mariscal, Toppenish Ana Marquez, Grandview
Rosalinda Marquez, Toppenish Lydia Marquez, Yakima Natalie Martinez, Sunnyside
Dulce Martinez, Sunnyside Daisy Martinez, Wapato Enrique Martinez, Toppenish
Andrea Martinez-Santiago, Toppenish Christina Mattson, Richland Stephanie Maybee, Selah
Sara McColloch, Pasco Shaunacy McMurray, Yakima Ashlee Mearns, Kennewick
Judit Medina, Kennewick David Mejia, Yakima Sandra Mena, Granger
Debbie Mendez, Yakima Stephanie Mendoza, Mabton Jazmin Mendoza, Pasco
Guadalupe Mendoza, Umatilla Jesus Mendoza Mendoza, Yakima Diana Meraz, Tieton
Cassandra Mercado, Pasco Jheymy Mercado-Covarrubias, Yakima Rebecca Meza, Sunnyside
Celine Michael, Yakima Gladys Monroy, Pasco Priscila Montiel, Yakima
Brenda Montoya-Roman, Yakima Domitila Morales, Pasco Ana Morales Villafan, Toppenish
Gabriela Moreno, Toppenish Eva Morfin, Kennewick James Muggli, Kennewick
Susana Naranjo, Yakima Guadalupe Navarro, Sunnyside Thuan-Thien Nguyen, Pasco
Andrew Nguyen, Yakima Edith Noriega, Sunnyside Arlene Olea, Sunnyside
Meaghan Oliver, Richland Rosa Olvera, Pasco Daysi Orduño Jacobo, Grandview
Lorena Ornelas, Sunnyside Joel Osorio, Toppenish Esther Osorio, Toppenish
Alexis Oxley, Grandview Rebecca Ozuna, Toppenish Liliana Padilla, Grandview
Miguel Palma, Yakima Mary Pantoja Gonzalez, Yakima Stephanie Pardo, Yakima
Seong Park, Yakima Shane Parkhurst, Kennewick Marcelo Penaloza, Toppenish
Yolanda Penaloza, Mabton Ana Perez, Pasco Hunter Perez, Kennewick
Jasmine Perez, Wapato Sabrina Persinger, Pasco Eric Philipp-Petrick, Yakima
Diana Picazo Villanueva, Outlook Allison Platsman, Sunnyside Angela Ponce, Zillah
Hunter Pryse, Yakima Casey Quantrille, Selah Daisy Quinones, White Swan
Lezly Quintanilla, Yakima Mayra Quintero, Wapato Viridiana Ramirez, Pasco
Elizabeth Ramirez, Toppenish Nichole Ramirez, Hermiston Briceida Ramos, Grandview
Olivia Ramos Alvarez, Kennewick Lazaro Ramos Aragon, Walla Walla Rosa Rangel, Connell
Amy Rapin, Sunnyside Anyssa Rebollero, Yakima Rocio Regis, Toppenish
Araceli Regis, Toppenish Joshua Rein, Wapato Shealynn Reuther, Wapato
Anitramarina Reyna, Yakima Amy Richter, Pendleton Rosa Rios, Moxee
Abigail Rivera, Zillah Timothy Roa, Wapato Morgan Roberts, Kennewick
Ellie Robins, Selah Grisel Rodriguez, Moxee Lizbeth Rodriguez, Wapato
Adriana Rodriguez, Kennewick Cassandra Rodriguez, Grandview Justin Rodriguez, Olympia
Sarah Romano, Richland Juan Romero, Zillah Kristian Romero, Zillah
Robert Romero, Sunnyside Monica Romero Castro, Grandview Erika Romero-Vargas, Pasco
Leidy Rosales, Pasco Eva Rosenow, Kennewick Lizett Ruiz, Yakima
Vah-Leria Sampson, Yakima Mayra Sanchez, Kennewick Nita Sanchez, Zillah
Amarilis Santiago, Toppenish Danielle Sauceda, Pasco Johnathan Schab, Prosser
Erika Scheel, Meridian Robert Schreiber, Yakima Margaret Sewell, Yakima
Jeniya Slutskaya, Kennewick Brandon Smith, Yakima Diana Solorio, Granger
Gerardo Soto, Zillah Maria Soto-Galvan, Yakima Anothony Stewart, Yakima
Christy Taylor, Othello Destiney Theisen, Kennewick Jacqueline Tlatelpa, Sunnyside
Stephanie Tolley, Othello LisaLyn Tormey, Yakima James Torres, Grandview
Maribel Torres, Richland Jonay Torres, Pasco Yanet Torres, Zillah
Brayan Torres, Sunnyside Alejandra Treece, Zillah Daisy Vaca, Wapato
Victoria Valdez, Toppenish Maria Valencia, Toppenish Anakaren Valenzuela, Toppenish
Juan Valladares, Yakima Elizabeth Van Corbach, Sunnyside Brenda Vasquez, Toppenish
Veronica Vigil, Yakima Maurita Villafan, Toppenish Julia Villagomez, Toppenish
Maria Villanueva, Yakima Citlaly Villegas, Wapato Arcelia Virgen, Wapato
Dawn Waheneka, Wapato Kyle Wandling, Pasco Mette Warnick, Richland
Robyn Webster, Yakima Katie Wentz, WhiteSwan Shelby White, Burbank
Devin Williams, Kennewick John Williams, Kennewick Janae Williams, Kennewick
Jasmine Yellow Owl, Zillah Zachary Zamora, Sunnyside Ruby Zarate, Moxee

 

Costco Co-Founder’s Family Foundation Selects Second Cohort of Scholarship Recipients at Heritage University

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Costco Co-Founder’s Family Foundation Selects Second Cohort of Scholarship Recipients at Heritage University  

Toppenish, Wash. – The Sinegal Family Foundation, created by Jim and Jan Sinegal, has selected five students who will comprise the second cohort of Sinegal Scholars at Heritage University. These five students will receive the Sinegal Family Foundation Scholarship, which includes full tuition, fees and a $500 stipend for books for up to four years of study toward the completion of a bachelor’s degree. The cohort will also receive regular mentoring opportunities with Heritage alumni who work at Costco headquarters in Issaquah, Wash. and with Jim Sinegal, the co-founder of Costco, himself.

The recipients and the high schools from which they graduated are Rebecca Gomez, AC Davis High School; Jason Grajales, White Swan High School; Nansi Iniguez, Toppenish High School; Miguel Mendoza, Toppenish High School; and Kareli Mora, Granger High School.

These five students will join the five Sinegal Family Foundation Scholars already pursuing their degrees at Heritage as a result of a $1.14 million donation by the Sinegal Family Foundation to Heritage University in 2017.  Each year five new scholarship recipients are selected and by 2021, the fourth year of the program, there will be a cohort of 20 Sinegal Scholars on campus. Sinegal and his wife Jan created the scholarship to assist students in pursuing their educational goals as well as being a partner with Heritage University in serving students and developing accomplished alumni.

The five recipients were chosen by a panel which included Mr. Sinegal and Heritage University graduates who now work at Costco headquarters in Issaquah. Selecting only five scholarship recipients was a daunting task. “The five named as the second cohort left long-lasting impressions on us all,” said Sinegal. “We can’t wait to work with them as they pursue their education, and watch them excel and succeed.”

Nansi Iniguez, who also has a twin brother who will attend Heritage this fall on a different scholarship, says receiving the Sinegal Family Foundation Scholarship is life changing for her family. “We are very thankful to Sinegal Family Foundation and Heritage for giving us this opportunity. This scholarship will make the dream of a college degree possible for me and my brother.”

Miguel Mendoza, who wants to pursue either an engineering or a medical degree, says the Sinegal scholarship will also make college possible for his family. “As a first-generation college student, my parents and I are thrilled to have this opportunity.  My parents work in agriculture, and those jobs are changing rapidly too. What once required mostly a strong back and determination, now requires advanced education. Nearly all the students of the valley will need a college degree in the future and I am so thankful for the Sinegal Family Foundation and Heritage for making college possible for me.”

For more information, contact David Wise, VP of University Advancement and Marketing at (509) 865-0717 or wise_d@heritage.edu.

 

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